Posts Tagged ‘reading for kids’

Stationary bike helps kids read, get fit

Kids have a lot of energy and it’s often found to be beneficial for them to move as they learn.  Now, teachers in Florida have found a way for kids to get exercise while they learn to read.  Here’s more about this unique “ride and read” initiative: ORLANDO, Fla. (WOFL FOX 35 ORLANDO) – As the wheels turn in the…

7 Recommended Movies for Discussion in Elementary English

Anne (Teacher) asks: Do you have any recommended short movies for discussion in elementary English class? Dr. Marion Blank answers: This question is one that is close to my heart since I have long used movies as a key tool in teaching. Films represent an amazingly powerful and motivating force and when they are blended into the curriculum, the children’s…

Recommended Family Book for Kids: Annie and Simon

Annie and Simon by Catharine O’Neill is a family book for kids we definitely think is worth the read. Melissa Young from Sweet on Books explains why: What You Need to Know: • This is a sweet, innocent little learn to read book. • The chapters are mini-short stories, not a continuous storyline, so you can read in any order…

Great Book for Kids: If You Sailed On The Mayflower in 1620

If you sailed on the Mayflower in 1620, you would have plenty of stories to tell.  Since that seems highly unlikely, however, Melissa Gaynor from Sweet on Books is here to explain what life for the pilgrims was like in this great book for kids by Ann McGovern: What You Need to Know: • This book introduces the reader to…

Halloween Book for Kids: Creepy Carrots

Creepy Carrots by Aaron Reynolds is a funny and spooky Halloween book for kids to read. Melissa Young from Sweet on Books shares more about this (not too) haunted veggie tale. What You Need to Know: • Creepy Carrots is a funny and spooky read, just in time for Halloween. • Creepy Carrots is the collaboration of author Aaron Reynolds…

Why Kids Should Choose Their Own Books to Read in School

Does a child require supervision to choose their own books to read in school? Some say yes, while others say no.   Joanne Yatvin weighs in at the Washington Post: At one time many public schools gave students time to read books of their own choosing, an activity based on the common-sense theory that kids will read what interests them, and…