Posts Tagged ‘teaching’

Seeing: An Unseen Component in Reading

Have you noticed that when your child reads, he or she points to each word, or skips lines, or finds it hard to read a hyphenated word (such as suc–cess) where the word starts at the end of one line and ends at the beginning of the next? Behaviors such as these are often markers of visual problems in processing…

The Online Learning Revolution (Schools That Work)

Edutopia has a nice series on their site called Schools That Work, which examines what school successes are made of. I particularly like their Online Learning Revolution segment. They write: “Is the future of learning online? Not exclusively. But online learning is expanding access to knowledge and personalizing learning in schools across the country. In regions where teachers (and resources)…

They Call Me Mister Fry

A few weeks ago I saw a performance of They Call Me Mister Fry, a one-man show by an elementary school teacher in the Los Angeles Unified School District. As Mr. Fry inspired me to steal a few of his teaching techniques in tutoring Victor, I decided to interview him. They Call Me Mister Fry chronicles your journey in becoming…

How to Handle Your Child’s Mistakes

If you have the opportunity to observe a classroom, you’re bound to see a pattern that is ever-present. Teachers will be asking lots of questions. In response, some kids will raise their hands, eager to show what good students they are. Others will respond quite differently, keeping their eyes averted and their hands down (while simultaneously praying that they not…

A Drab Building Houses a Bright Future

In the past few months, while I’ve been working to set up the conditions to enable Victor to do the Reading Kingdom on a regular basis, I’ve also introduced the program to two learning centers run by School on Wheels. The other day I visited one of the centers in the neighborhood formerly named South Central. In 2003 the city…

Sight Words: What We Fail to See

“Oh he knows some sight words, but he really can’t read.” This is an observation often offered by both parents and teachers about young children. Contained within it is a central, albeit hidden, assumption; namely, that “sight words” represent an inferior form of reading –a form that falls short of “real reading.” Is this, in fact, the case? This interpretation…