You Can Now Access 1.4 Million Books for Free Thanks to the Internet Archive

By Maddie Bender for vice.com

Students, teachers, and readers can now access over 1.4 million books for free as part of the National Emergency Library, a project launched on Tuesday by the Internet Archive to aid remote learning efforts.

Covid-19 has pushed millions of students’ classes online and temporarily shuttered public libraries. The Internet Archive, a nonprofit organization known for creating the Wayback Machine, has previously digitized more than one million books donated by educational institutions and libraries. The books in the National Emergency Library are titles from Open Library, another Internet Archive project, that have had their waitlists removed. Unlike a typical lending library, multiple users can access a single digital copy of a book at the same time.

“Internet Archive’s mission is to provide ‘Universal Access to All Knowledge.’ We believe this is an extraordinary moment in time that requires assistance at a scale that we are able to provide,” reads an FAQ for the project. “Suspending waitlists will put books in the hands of people who need them, supporting emergency remote teaching, research activities, independent scholarship, and intellectual stimulation while universities, schools, training centers, and libraries are closed.”

Read more here.

Help your child learn to read with Reading Kingdom. Sign up today for a free 30 day trial.