Reading Kingdom succeeds where traditional teaching strategies come up short: Mom discovers solution

teaching-strategies

Carey is a mom who found out how quickly our reading program can find AND fix flaws in traditional teaching strategies used for language development.  Here’s what she had to say after introducing her daughter to the Reading Kingdom:

When Sprout began using Reading Kingdom, despite the fact that I’d read some of the information about what sets this program apart (which you can read in more detail here), I was surprised by a number of things. First, although Sprout had already completed a keyboarding program online (and she is the only one of my three children who correctly places her fingers on the home row keys to type), the program assessed her as needing to practice this skill… To be honest, I was a little put out at first, thinking of all the hours she’d already spent on learning this skill, and supposing her to be proficient. However, Reading Kingdom goes beyond the program she used previously, teaching her where all the punctuation keys are, and how to use the shift key to type a capital letter. It wouldn’t accept mistakes.

After completing the keyboarding portion of the program, Sprout was again assessed. This time for her reading abilities. Again I was shocked. Although she is capable of reading such words as “appreciate,” her assessment placed her in Level One, learning words like “bird” and “girl.”

I reserved judgment, noting that Sprout was enjoying the graphics and the “fun” elements of the program, and I kept watching to see how she was doing. I was surprised that the program wanted her to master spelling each word before it introduced a simple story that included the words.

Spelling and writing mastery before reading?

At this point, Sprout also became impatient with the program. She felt she wasn’t really “reading” in Reading Kingdom. She expected something like other reading programs she had encountered, I suppose, and since she does enjoy reading, she was looking for the longer passages she’s become accustomed to.

But she couldn’t spell “girl”

So I decided to have her do a reading assessment. I wanted to see whether the evaluation from an independent reading assessment would give me a clue about why Reading Kingdom had my daughter beginning in Level One.

And here’s what I found out: while Sprout’s reading comprehension skills are at a high 5th grade level, with her oral vocabulary at mid 5th (thank you, read-alouds), and her word recognition at a respectable high 1st grade, her spelling abilities ranked only at mid 1st grade, and her phonemic awareness is “poor.”

I noticed that when asked to spell the word “sit,” she spelled it “set,” and she often confused the short “a” sound for “u.”

Since Reading Kingdom takes a much more comprehensive approach to a child’s ability to use language, it places equal importance on writing/spelling and reading. These skills are ultimately essential for the child’s overall success in reading, comprehension, and use of the language.

At this writing, although we used the program at least as much as recommended–four 15-30 minute sessions per week–Sprout is still just beginning.

It’s a Keeper

She is still a little impatient with the pace of her progress. But armed with this new information about her abilities and weaknesses, I was able to encourage her to think of the program not just as a “reading” program, but as a spelling and writing program too. I plan to allow her to use it in place of her regular spelling time, and while the older children and I are studying writing.

I am beginning to see just how valuable this program is, and wishing I had had it available for my other two children, as I’m sure it would have helped them to be better, more proficient readers, writers and spellers.

We plan to use this program to its completion, and I look forward to having a proficient reader, writer and speller when we’re done!

See how Reading Kingdom can help your child learn to read on their own in just a few months – sign up for a free 30 day trial today.  Lingo and company will see you soon!